Friday, September 16, 2005

And we wonder why Parisians hate us...

Becca and I spent 6 1/2 hours at the Louvre on Wednesday.  Absolutely amazing and left us wanting more but not mentally or physically being able to. 
 
One stunning story to pass on though.  We were at one of the many merchandise kiosks in the Louvre picking up a guide of the place when we heard the following exchange:
 
Salesperson (in perfect English, by the way): Is that all? 
American Woman (packing about 100 euros in books and pointing at a multilingual DVD about the Louvre):  Does this DVD come in American?
Salesperson: Yes, it comes in English.
American Woman: I know it comes in English, does it come in American?
Salesperson (quizzical look firmly on at this point): Yes, it comes in English.
American Woman (pointing to the British flag on the DVD cover): I asked if it comes in American.
Salesperson (getting pretty flustered): It comes in English.
 
The last two lines are repeated at least 2-3 more times before the American woman just gets this look of "stupid French" on her face, puts down the DVD and buys the rest.  Becca and I weren't sure whether to laugh or bonk the lady upside the head with our new guide. 
 
Any opinions on what the DVD language differences would be between American and English?  Leave 'em in the comments section.
 
Brian

4 comments:

blondebombchelle said...

Well, if there is any commentary on the elevators in the Louve, the stupid american might be confused what a lift is...

We also have to remember, there are stupid people all over the world. We don't have the corner on the market ;-)

J said...

English edition less like to contain sentences punctuated by "Like," "Oh my God!" and "YeeeeeeHawwwww!!!"

(Notcice I said *less* likely to contain such words, there are some paintings, however, where only a good "YeeeeeHawwww!!!" will do it justice. I think you'll find most serious art critics and scholars agree.)

Anonymous said...

I think she was talking about the formating of the DVD. British use a different formatting than the Americans. If you buy a Wallace & Gromit in Glasgow you are SOL when you try to play it on your VCR in St. Paul.
Although she might be asking an intellegent question, her communication skills were quite American....

wadE said...

Good point, I hadn't even thought of the DVD thing... but I'm guessing she wasn't that smart, b/c I'm thinking she would have clarified her question in that case.

My own thoughts on the French. Yes, they are rude... but not just to Americans, but to everyone, even each other. If you make a decent attempt to speak their language, and aren't too loud or obnoxious, you have a decent chance of getting a friendly response, but sometime you'll get the stereotypical rudeness regardless.